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26. Jonathan Snow: So What Exactly Happened to all the Bees? And Why?

On this episode we discuss the ominous question, Why are the bees disappearing and are humans to blame?

We have a fascinating conversation on everything from the cellular stress responses of the honey bee, to how bug populations in general seem to be dwindling down, to what humans can do top help bolster the bee population.

Jonathan Snow
Jonathan Snow

Jonathan Snow is an assistant professor of biology who studies the cellular stress responses of the honey bee. Attaching the question of why the honey bee has face an increased rate of die off as of late.

25. Natalia Petrzela: FIT NATION: How Americans Embraced Exercise As the Government Abandoned It

Historian, professor, and podcast host Natalia Petrzela takes us through her upcoming book Fit Nation.

We discuss the contemporary perceptions and landscape of the fitness culture in the United States along with how perceptions and meanings associated with fitness have changed over time.

Link to the Runners World article:

Link to her website:

Link to her podcast:

24. Linda Allen: An Alternative Theory For Explaining the Magnitude of the Great Recession.

Link to her faculty page:

Linda Allen is a professor of finance at Baruch college who maintains interests in the field of financial risk.

We have a fascinating discussion on the 07-08 crisis focusing on an alternative theory to why the magnitude of The Great Recession was so pronounced. We also discuss some lessons you can take away from the crash and doing your due diligence.

23. Nizan Packin: The Positives & Negatives of Our Inevitable Fintech Future.

Link to her faculty page:

Nizan Packin is an associate professor at the Zicklin school of business who focuses on law and finance. In particular holding interests in fintech, big data, net banks, and how they all come together. 

We have a fascinating conversation on how big data and algorithms are playing a much more prominent role in financial decision making.

We discuss regulatory arbitrage, technology firms becoming banks, and the positive and negative impacts of our fintech future. 

22. Anwar Shaikh: Starting Off on The Wrong Foot. Is Economics Predicated on The Wrong Basic Assumptions?

Link to his faculty page:

Professor Anwar Shaikh is a heterodox professor of economics whose book Capitalism: Capital, Conflict, Crisis is our main topic of discussion.

We go down a fascinating road on his main thesis that what drives capitalism and its cyclical nature can be explained by intrinsic forces such as the profit motive for corporations.

This, as opposed to the current orthodox view that the rational actor, who care only about their consumption, makes the world go round in a sense.

The talk encompasses subtopics ranging from his background as a social activist to how his theory of capitalism differs from orthodox theory, to how the lay person should view capitalism.

21. Carol Garber: What is Exercise & is Society Getting Enough of It?

Carol Garber is a professor of movement sciences at Columbia University who focuses on the role of exercise in preventing chronic disease and the social promotion of physical activity to communities.

We cover topics and questions such as what is exercise, is it ever too late to start exercising, and are underprivileged children getting enough exercise.

Link to her faculty page:

Will the state of the U.S economy be a factor during the 2020 election?

Assistant professor of political science Michael Sances answers:

“Presidential elections are typically referendums on the state of the economy, but as we all know, presidents inherit economies from their predecessors. Will voters attribute recent positive economic performance to Trump, or will they attribute it to his predecessor Barack Obama? In research I am working on now, I find that voters almost always attribute the current economy to the current incumbent, whether that incumbent has been in office for six months or six years. So, I think the economy will ultimately work toward Trump’s re-election. The Democratic nominee will have to either convince voters the economy is not that strong, or focus on other issues. I am skeptical voters can be convinced that the economy is not Trump’s responsibility.”

Michael Sances
Michael Sances

Michael Sances is an assistant professor of political science at Temple University. His research has been featured in a number of academic journals along with in popular media outlets such as the NYT, VOX & The Economist.

Does the nominee from the Democratic Party even matter? (2020 Election)

Assistant professor of political science Michael Sances answers:

“Will the Democratic nominee really affect what happens in November? Statistical models that ignore any qualities of the candidates do a pretty good job at predicting general election winners. More anecdotally, a low-quality nominee in 2016 did not seem to hurt the Republican party’s chances. Despite the intense media attention around who will win the nomination, I do not think it is entirely unreasonable to argue that it will not ultimately matter much.”

Michael Sances
Michael Sances

Michael Sances is an assistant professor of political science at Temple University. His research has been featured in a number of academic journals along with in popular media outlets such as the NYT, VOX & The Economist.

20. Andrew Iliadis: The Most Important Part of The Internet You Have Never Heard Of / The Semantic Web

Andrew Iliadis is an assistant professor within the department of media studies at Temple University who’s research focuses on the social implications of data science and semantic computing. 

We have a fascinating conversation on web infrastructure, the semantic web, data usage, the future of the internet, getting away from digital walled gardens, and much more. 

Link to his website: